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  • Cosmo Nardozza

Types of Grass

North: Kentucky Bluegrass

Cool season grasses do best in more moderate temperatures, and this grass is ideal. "It's great for heavy traffic, it's very durable, and it's self-repairing, Dwyer says. 


North: Perennial Ryegrass

This is a popular choice if you want to mix grasses thanks to its ability to grow quickly and hold up under heavy traffic, but it can also be sown on its own.


North: Fine Fescue

This fine grass prefers shade, making it a good option for areas beneath trees. It won't hold up to foot traffic as well as Kentucky bluegrass, but you can use it for filling in areas where other types of grass might not grow.


North/Transition: Tall Fescue

With its deep roots, this type of grass can survive drought periods—great for areas near the transition zone, or places that don't get tons of rain. It also withstands heat well, so it will work in super hot regions.


Transition: Zoysia Grass

This transition zone grass prefers full sun. Its thickness makes it a popular option for golf courses.


Transition: Bermuda Grass

This versatile warm-season grass does well in areas that often reach the upper 80s and 90s, but it can also withstand colder periods. It's common down south and in California.


South: St. Augustine Grass

Even further down south—in parts of southern Texas and Florida—you'll want a grass that can tolerate extreme heat and droughts. This wide-bladed grass is coarse and tough, and can even be grown in soils with some sand.


South: Centipede Grass

Looking for a low-maintenance option? This one's for you! This short, low-growing grass holds its own against pests and is commonly found in the Carolinas, Louisiana, and Mississippi since it can grow in acidic soils.


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